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Be it resolved: Barry Aulis Compton-Stanstead, QcEdit

Dual electoral systemEdit

Like many I know that our first past the post election system doesn't give us a representative House of Commons but also like many I don't like the various proposed proportional representation systems either. After the Quebec 1998 general election where the Liberals got more votes then the PQ but the PQ formed a majority government with it being a few seats short of having a 2/3 majority I thought we really do need an alternative to first past the post. What follows is my proposed alternative to FPTP and PR elections.

This proposed system of representation comes from the House of Commons itself. It can be said of the House of Commons that it is a group of 308 voters who choose from among their number two principle leaders, one who leads the majority caucus of the house and one who leads it's minority. This is the basis of the dual electoral system.

Federalistwebmaster 14:58, April 20, 2010 (UTC)


Draft resolution as introducedEdit

A preference ballot is used for voting. The candidate with the number one on a ballot gets one vote. The two candidates with the most votes are elected. The ballots are counted a second time with the elected candidate with the lower number getting one vote. Each elected member has one "member vote" in the House to be used in regular sessions and one "legislative vote" for each vote received on the second count of the ballots and is voted when the House is in legislative session and is used to pass what else legislation! One day a week is set by the Commons for the legisative session and any bills requiring third reading are voted on during that session.


Results for the Quebec General Elections 1998 / 2003

Assuming that the ADQ vote goes 67% PQ and 33% Lib on the second count and in ridings where the ADQ gets elected the defeated PQ or Liberal candidate’s votes all go to the ADQ and all other votes split 50/50 gives the following election results.


1998 General Election
PQ 123 members 50% Legislative vote 43% popular vote
Lib 123 members 48% Legislative 44% popular vote
ADQ 3 members 1.75% legislative 12% popular
Eq 1 member 0.25% legislative 1% popular


2003 General Election
Lib 121 members 50% legislative 46% popular
PQ 109 members 38% legislative 34% popular
ADQ 20 members 12% legislative 18% popular



The main drawback of this system is if you keep the same number of ridings you will double the number of members or having the same number of members will double the size of the electoral ridings.

Benefits of the Dual Electoral System

  1. Guarantee of an opposition since no party can get more than 50% of the seats.
  2. In regular sessions the members have one vote each so there'll be nonpartisan voting on the election of the Speaker, rules of the House ( two thirds majority), procedural motions, and committee membership.
  3. In legislative session you'll have proportional representation since each member will have one vote for each vote received on the second count of the ballots.
  4. No party lists and you are still voting for the member of Parliament of your choice. One MP represents the majority vote in the riding and the other MP the main minority vote.
  5. No major revision of the electoral map. Ridings should only be altered when the number of electors in the riding is 150% or more or 50% or less of the average number of electors per riding. Each election few if any ridings will change. This will mitigate the political fighting over riding boundaries or size for the purpose of any real or imagined partisan gain.
  6. Also an incentive to vote since the more votes an MP gets the more votes they have on voting on legislation. Also ridings and provinces will increase their voting strength in the house if their voting turnout is higher than the average.
  7. Every vote counts since one of the two elected candidates will get your vote!


Acting President Barry Aulis Compton-Stanstead, Qc president@federalistparty.ca

Results for the House of Commons, British Columbia, Quebec, P.E.I.Edit

House of Commons 1997 / 2000 / 2004 / 2006 / 2008Edit

2008 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Cons 38 143 238 *
Lib 26 76 200 *
NDP 18 37 104 *
Bloc 10 50 66 *
Green 7 0 5 *
Ind 1 2 3 *
2006 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Cons 36 124 241 *
Lib 30 103 219 *
NDP 17 29 82 *
Bloc 10 51 71 *
Green 4 0 1 *
Ind 1 1 2 *
2004 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 37 135 280 *
Cons 30 99 189 *
NDP 16 19 70 *
Bloc 12 54 73 *
Green 4 0 0 *
Ind 1 1 4 *
2000 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 41 172 279 *
Nat All 25 66 166 *
NDP 9 13 38 *
Bloc 11 38 72 *
PC 12 12 45 *
Ind 1 0 2 *
1997 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 38 155 261 *
Ref 19 60 116 *
NDP 11 21 62 *
Bloc 11 44 67 *
PC 19 20 94 *
Ind 1 1 2 *

British Columbia 2001 / 2005 / 2009Edit

2001 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 58 77 79 57-78%
NDP 22 2 79 22-43%
2005 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 46 46 79 46-59%
NDP 42 33 79 41-54%
2009 % vote Seats Dual Leg vote
Lib 46 49 85 46-58%
NDP 42 36 83 42-54%
Ind 0 2 ~1%

Quebec 1998 / 2003 / 2007 / 2008Edit

2008 % vote Seats Dual % Leg
Liberal 42 66 123
PQ 35 51 105
ADQ 16 7 17
QS 4 1 2
Green 2 0 3
2007 % vote Seats Dual % Leg
Liberal 33 48 80 32-40
ADQ 31 41 87 32-40
PQ 28 36 78 26-33
Green 4 0 3 ~1%
QS 4 0 2 ~1%
2003 % vote Seats Dual % Leg
Liberal 46 76 121 50
PQ 34 45 109 38
ADQ 18 4 20 12
1998 % vote seats Dual % Leg
PQ 43 76 123 50
Liberal 44 48 123 48
ADQ 12 1 3 2
Eq 1 0 1 >1


Prince Edward Island 2003 / 2007Edit

2007 % Vote Seats Dual % Leg vote
Lib 53 23 27 53 / 59
Cons 41 4 27 41 / 47
2003 % Vote Seats Dual % Leg vote
Cons 54 23 27 54 / 57
Lib 43 4 27 43 / 46

Draft resolution as amendedEdit